Be a part of the largest learning event in history: TCAPS Hour of Code! Computer science education week is December 6-12, 2021.

TCAPS Codes

Hour of Code

Make Computer Science Fun, Starting with an Hour of Code

Computer Science Education Week is an annual call to action to inspire K-12 students to learn computer science. With technology changing every industry on the planet, computing knowledge has become part of a must have high demand, well rounded skill set. The Hour of Code is a one-hour introduction to computer science, designed to demystify code and show that anybody can learn the basics. This annual, nation-wide program has allowed millions of students to discover how accessible and fun computer science can be by doing just one Hour of Code.

Computer science empowers students to create the world of tomorrow. Satya Nadella, Microsoft CEO

TCAPS Hour of Code: December 6-12, 2021

During the second week of December (12/6-12/12), all students are invited to participate in TCAPS Hour of Code! Teachers will be opting in for their classrooms to participate and the classes with the most student participation will win a pizza party. There will also be other prizes, giveaways, and opportunities to meet and hear from IT and STEM professionals along the way. Families can even join in on the fun and are encouraged to participate from their home with their children. Hour of CODE has opportunities for everyone! We encourage all parents to discuss and emphasize the importance of computer science and coding with their child(ren) to help get them excited about this year’s Hour of Code! 

TCAPS' Hour of Code sites 

The Traverse City Area Public Library is also hosting events for Hour of Code.
You can check them out here.

 

2021-2022 School Participation:

 

Click here to view the full list of LIVE Hour of Code events!

The Traverse City Area Public Library is also hosting events for Hour of Code. You can check them out here.

Computing jobs are the #1 source of new wages in the U.S.A computer science major can earn 40% more than the college average.Only 25% of high school CS students, university CS graduates, and people employed in tech fields are female.Computer science is foundational.The majority of schools don't teach computer science.The majority of schools don't teach computer science.The "STEM" problem is in computer science.Students enjoy computer science and the arts the most!

Why is your school doing an Hour of Code?

While all of us know that it’s important for students to learn how to navigate today’s tech-saturated world, many teachers aren’t experienced in computer science and don’t know where to start. This event is a chance for all of us to see what computer science is about.

We hope it’ll spark interest in students to keep learning. Research also shows that kids can pick up programming concepts before they know how to read and write. In fact, their brains are more receptive to computer languages at a young age, just like foreign languages.
 

Why is this important?

Technology is transforming every industry on the planet. In 2015, 7 million openings in the U.S. were in occupations—including art and design—that value coding skills. But 53 percent of schools in the U.S. don't teach computer science. It’s time for us to catch up to the 21st century. We know that regardless of what our students do when they grow up, whether they go into medicine, business, politics, or the arts, knowing how to build technology will give them confidence and a competitive edge.

Code.org is a 501c3 public non-profit dedicated to expanding participation in computer science and increasing participation by young women and students from other underrepresented groups. Its vision is that every student in every school has the opportunity to learn computer programming. After launching in 2013, Code.org organized the Hour of Code campaign – which has introduced over 100 million students to computer science to date – and partnered with 70 public school districts nationwide to expand computer science programs. Code.org is supported by philanthropic donations from corporations, foundations and generous individuals, including Microsoft, Facebook, Infosys Foundation USA, Amazon, and others. For more information, please visit: code.org.